The current stables are located at the bottom of Summer Hill, (formerly Burnt Mill Hill), behind what is known as Tramway Terrace. During the operational months, they are ‘home’ to the tramways team of horses. Visitors are welcome to look around, either on their own, or during the guided tours which were introduced in 2016. In the early days of the tramway, as well as the current stables, there was additional stabling for the horses at the site where the Kaye Memorial Gardens are now situated, and also at a couple of other locations. This building was originally acquired by Thomas Lightfoot in 1877, and has been modified over the years. The roof was replaced over the winter of 1996/7. Recent modifications to the internal layout of the building include the replacement of stalls in the upper and lower levels with more modern loose boxes. The total number of horses that can be stabled here is twenty four. A new sign was added to the exterior on the 29th April 2005, and the the lower floor windows (including the window to the old Crescent Post Office) have been covered with a timetable and advertising. In 2009 more remedial works were carried out to the exterior of the building and to the chimneys.
‘Tramway Terrace’ Photo  Kim Watterson
The yard is a busy part of the stables during the season. It is still lined with the original cobbles that are also present throughout the older, unmodified parts of the building. The tractor, trailer and pickup are stored here. The horses that are stabled in the lower loose boxes are brought out to have their legs washed, then led down to the front door. A small sink was also installed during the improvement works for 2005, enabling visitors to wash their hands after feeding the horses.
The lower loose boxes were created in 2004, to replace the fourteen original wooden stalls (seven on each side with a central aisle). Two stalls at the end of the room remain, although they are no longer in use. The work was carried out by Southwards Ltd, with a scheduled time of sixteen weeks to complete. The interior of the building was completely stripped out and strengthened using six new vertical supports and a new floor with drainage was added. The whole area is a lot brighter with newly installed lighting, and is a much better environment for the horses to live in. There is a total of eight loose boxes here, with steps leading to the upper level. The horses can all see each other over the dividing walls and can also see the horses opposite them. Each loose box has a tie ring, a large hay rack, automatic drinking bowl, a salt and mineral lick, a manger for feed and wood pellet bedding. The horses are identified by a nameplate hung above each box. Each horse has it’s own set of harness.
‘Before - lower stalls’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net ‘Conversion works’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net ‘New lower loose boxes’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net
The upper loose boxes were created in 2000, to replace the forty five original wooden stalls. The picture in the photo below was taken in June 1968, and shows the original arrangement.  There were three distinct sections, each with a central aisle and nine stalls on each side of two sections and one row of nine in the last section. The two end stalls in two of the sections were enclosed by doors - these were reserved for horses that might be nervous, or not tolerate others. The new boxes were designed by Hyder Consultants, with the work being carried out by McArds. The cost of the refurbishment was £220,000. The interior of the building has been completely stripped out and strengthened, and a new floor and roof added. The exterior of the building has remained the same. The whole area is very light and spacious, due to the high ceiling, giving a cleaner environment for the horses to live in. There is a total of fifteen loose boxes here, split into two sections both with a central aisle. There is also one loose box at the back of the building, next to the smithy. The horses can all see each other over the dividing walls and can also see the horses opposite them. Each loose box has a tie ring, hay rack, automatic drinking bowl, salt and mineral lick, a manger for feed and wood pellet bedding. The horses are identified by a nameplate hung on the wall or door outside each box. Harness is stored on pegs, and there is also room for large round bales of hay or haylage.  There is access to two storage lofts and an area where horses can be safely tied up to have their legs washed before work.  The horses are led out through the private car park to be changed over across the road.
‘After - upper loose boxes’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net ‘Before - upper stalls’ Photo  James Waite
The smithy is located at the very back of the building. Years ago the shoes were hand made from different lengths of mild steel to suit a variety of different sized horses. About one month before the horses were brought in from the fields, around two hundred pairs of shoes started to be made. (It is worth noting here that front and back pairs are different). When made, they were hung on pegs on the wall beside the forge. These pegs still exist and are used today. Until the end of 1973 the blacksmith was Andy Joughin. He used to run his own business in Douglas, retiring to leave his son Tom to carry it on. He must have been at least in his mid-seventies, originally taking the job for the season. As it turned out he ended up working there for four years. Again, it was his son that replaced him as the blacksmith, working alongside an apprentice who would qualify, and ensure that the profession would continue. Michael Crellin now takes over this role, but nowadays the horses are shod with ready-made shoes bought in. Shoes are generally re-fitted approximately every four weeks, but if a shoe becomes loose it will be carried out before then. Interesting fact: In 1938, rubber was added to the shoes, in an attempt to provide better grip on the road. This trial proved unsuccessful.
‘Tom Joughin’ Photo  Brian Mitchell ‘The smithy’ Photos  douglashorsetramway.net
A new harness room was installed in May 2005.  It features a large central table with sink for cleaning harness, and all four walls are lined with hooks for hanging a complete set - (collar, hames and bridle). All harness is now being stored here when not in use over the winter (the old harness room was located in Tramway Terrace). Other bits of harness include the rarely used breast collars, a box full of name plates, various lengths of hame straps, breaking harness (lighter tubular hames, rope traces and sidelines), headcollars, lead ropes and rope halters. Years ago a saddler was employed to repair the harness, but nowadays it is sent away for any repairs which may be required at the end of each season.
‘New harness room’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net
The feed room is located on the ramp to the upper level and all feed is stored and prepared here. Feed buckets, scoops and various supplements are also kept here. Oats are fed into a hopper above the oat roller which then crushes them to make them easier to digest, enabling the energy to be quickly obtained. This area used to contain six stalls, (the partition of which still remains), the cobbled floor is also still present.
‘Oat roller’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net
The ‘little stable’ is a small room off to the side of the yard, containing seven of the original stalls. Each stall has a tie ring, with a long line which enabled the horse to move around and lie down, a large hay rack, automatic drinking bowl, a salt and mineral lick and a manger for feed. The floor is lined with original cobbles. Each horse was identified by a name plate hanging above them, and each horse had its own collar, hames and bridle hanging on pegs to the left hand side.  This part of the stables received a new roof in April 2005, which now has three skylights to provide more natural light. These stalls are not used now, but have been retained to provide a history of the building. In 2016 the room was opened up once more as a small gift shop and museum, containing information and old photos. It can be viewed during the stable tours, which take place throughout the season.
‘The yard’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net ‘The little stable’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net
Tramway Stables Tucked away behind Tramway Terrace, the stables have been ‘home’ to the horses since 1877. Although modernised over the years, the old charm of a working stable is still evident.
Photo  www.douglashorsetramway.net
‘Raad tram-cabbil baie ghoolish’ “….tinkling tramcars, like toast racks, Sweeping the curve of the bay.” (Sir Hall Caine) The Douglas Bay Horse Tramway Horsepower!
The current stables are located at the bottom of Summer Hill, (formerly Burnt Mill Hill), behind what is known as Tramway Terrace. During the operational months, they are ‘home’ to the tramways team of horses. Visitors are welcome to look around, either on their own, or during the guided tours which were introduced in 2016. In the early days of the tramway, as well as the current stables, there was additional stabling for the horses at the site where the Kaye Memorial Gardens are now situated, and also at a couple of other locations. This building was originally acquired by Thomas Lightfoot in 1877, and has been modified over the years. The roof was replaced over the winter of 1996/7. Recent modifications to the internal layout of the building include the replacement of stalls in the upper and lower levels with more modern loose boxes. The total number of horses that can be stabled here is twenty four. A new sign was added to the exterior on the 29th April 2005, and the the lower floor windows (including the window to the old Crescent Post Office) have been covered with a timetable and advertising. In 2009 more remedial works were carried out to the exterior of the building and to the chimneys.
The yard is a busy part of the stables during the season. It is still lined with the original cobbles that are also present throughout the older, unmodified parts of the building. The tractor, trailer and pickup are stored here. The horses that are stabled in the lower loose boxes are brought out to have their legs washed, then led down to the front door. A small sink was also installed during the improvement works for 2005, enabling visitors to wash their hands after feeding the horses.
The ‘little stable’ is a small room off to the side of the yard, containing seven of the original stalls. Each stall has a tie ring, with a long line which enabled the horse to move around and lie down, a large hay rack, automatic drinking bowl, a salt and mineral lick and a manger for feed. The floor is lined with original cobbles. Each horse was identified by a name plate hanging above them, and each horse had its own collar, hames and bridle hanging on pegs to the left hand side.  This part of the stables received a new roof in April 2005, which now has three skylights to provide more natural light. These stalls are not used now, but have been retained to provide a history of the building. In 2016 it was opened up once more as a small gift shop and exhibition room, containing information and old photos. It can be viewed during the stable tours, which take place throughout the season.
‘Tramway Terrace’ Photo  Kim Watterson ‘The yard’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net ‘The little stable’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net
The lower loose boxes were created in 2004, to replace the fourteen original wooden stalls (seven on each side with a central aisle). Two stalls at the end of the room remain, although they are no longer in use. The work was carried out by Southwards Ltd, with a scheduled time of sixteen weeks to complete. The interior of the building was completely stripped out and strengthened using six new vertical supports and a new floor with drainage was added. The whole area is a lot brighter with newly installed lighting, and is a much better environment for the horses to live in. There is a total of eight loose boxes here, with steps leading to the upper level. The horses can all see each other over the dividing walls and can also see the horses opposite them. Each loose box has a tie ring, a large hay rack, automatic drinking bowl, a salt and mineral lick, a manger for feed and wood pellet bedding. The horses are identified by a nameplate hung above each box. Each horse has it’s own set of harness.
‘Before - lower stalls’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net ‘Conversion works’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net ‘New lower loose boxes’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net
The upper loose boxes were created in 2000, to replace the forty five original wooden stalls. The picture in the photo below was taken in June 1968, and shows the original arrangement.  There were three distinct sections, each with a central aisle and nine stalls on each side of two sections and one row of nine in the last section. The two end stalls in two of the sections were enclosed by doors - these were reserved for horses that might be nervous, or not tolerate others. The new boxes were designed by Hyder Consultants, with the work being carried out by McArds. The cost of the refurbishment was £220,000. The interior of the building has been completely stripped out and strengthened, and a new floor and roof added. The exterior of the building has remained the same. The whole area is very light and spacious, due to the high ceiling, giving a cleaner environment for the horses to live in. There is a total of fifteen loose boxes here, split into two sections both with a central aisle. There is also one loose box at the back of the building, next to the smithy. The horses can all see each other over the dividing walls and can also see the horses opposite them. Each loose box has a tie ring, hay rack, automatic drinking bowl, salt and mineral lick, a manger for feed and wood pellet bedding. The horses are identified by a nameplate hung on the wall or door outside each box. Harness is stored on pegs, and there is also room for large round bales of hay or haylage.  There is access to two storage lofts and an area where horses can be safely tied up to have their legs washed before work.  The horses are led out through the private car park to be changed over across the road.
‘After - upper loose boxes’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net
The feed room is located on the ramp to the upper level and all feed is stored and prepared here. Feed buckets, scoops and various supplements are also kept here. Oats are fed into a hopper above the oat roller which then crushes them to make them easier to digest, enabling the energy to be quickly obtained. This area used to contain six stalls, (the partition of which still remains), the cobbled floor is also still present.
The smithy is located at the very back of the building. Years ago the shoes were hand made from different lengths of mild steel to suit a variety of different sized horses. About one month before the horses were brought in from the fields, around two hundred pairs of shoes started to be made. (It is worth noting here that front and back pairs are different). When made, they were hung on pegs on the wall beside the forge. These pegs still exist and are used today. Until the end of 1973 the blacksmith was Andy Joughin. He used to run his own business in Douglas, retiring to leave his son Tom to carry it on. He must have been at least in his mid-seventies, originally taking the job for the season. As it turned out he ended up working there for four years. Again, it was his son that replaced him as the blacksmith, working alongside an apprentice who would qualify, and ensure that the profession would continue. Michael Crellin now takes over this role, but nowadays the horses are shod with ready-made shoes bought in. Shoes are generally re-fitted approximately every four weeks, but if a shoe becomes loose it will be carried out before then. Interesting fact: In 1938, rubber was added to the shoes, in an attempt to provide better grip on the road. This trial proved unsuccessful.
‘Tom Joughin’ Photo  Brian Mitchell ‘The smithy’ Photos  douglashorsetramway.net
A new harness room was installed in May 2005.  It features a large central table with sink for cleaning harness, and all four walls are lined with hooks for hanging a complete set - (collar, hames and bridle). All harness is now being stored here when not in use over the winter (the old harness room was located in Tramway Terrace). Other bits of harness include the rarely used breast collars, a box full of name plates, various lengths of hame straps, breaking harness (lighter tubular hames, rope traces and sidelines), headcollars, lead ropes and rope halters. Years ago a saddler was employed to repair the harness, but nowadays it is sent away for any repairs which may be required at the end of each season.
‘New harness room’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net
‘Before - upper stalls’ Photo  James Waite ‘Oat roller’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net
Tramway Stables Tucked away behind Tramway Terrace, the stables have been ‘home’ to the horses since 1877. Although modernised over the years, the old charm of a working stable is still evident.
Photo  www.douglashorsetramway.net Horsepower!
“….tinkling tramcars, like toast racks, Sweeping the curve of the bay.” (Sir Hall Caine) The Douglas Bay Horse Tramway Raad tram-cabbil baie ghoolish
The current stables are located at the bottom of Summer Hill, (formerly Burnt Mill Hill), behind what is known as Tramway Terrace. During the operational months, they are ‘home’ to the tramways team of horses. Visitors are welcome to look around, either on their own, or during the guided tours which were introduced in 2016. In the early days of the tramway, as well as the current stables, there was additional stabling for the horses at the site where the Kaye Memorial Gardens are now situated, and also at a couple of other locations. This building was originally acquired by Thomas Lightfoot in 1877, and has been modified over the years. The roof was replaced over the winter of 1996/7. Recent modifications to the internal layout of the building include the replacement of stalls in the upper and lower levels with more modern loose boxes. The total number of horses that can be stabled here is twenty four. A new sign was added to the exterior on the 29th April 2005, and the the lower floor windows (including the window to the old Crescent Post Office) have been covered with a timetable and advertising. In 2009 more remedial works were carried out to the exterior of the building and to the chimneys.
‘Tramway Terrace’ Photo  Kim Watterson
The yard is a busy part of the stables during the season. It is still lined with the original cobbles that are also present throughout the older, unmodified parts of the building. The tractor, trailer and pickup are stored here. The horses that are stabled in the lower loose boxes are brought out to have their legs washed, then led down to the front door. A small sink was also installed during the improvement works for 2005, enabling visitors to wash their hands after feeding the horses.
‘The yard’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net
The lower loose boxes were created in 2004, to replace the fourteen original wooden stalls (seven on each side with a central aisle). Two stalls at the end of the room remain, although they are no longer in use. The work was carried out by Southwards Ltd, with a scheduled time of sixteen weeks to complete. The interior of the building was completely stripped out and strengthened using six new vertical supports and a new floor with drainage was added. The whole area is a lot brighter with newly installed lighting, and is a much better environment for the horses to live in. There is a total of eight loose boxes here, with steps leading to the upper level. The horses can all see each other over the dividing walls and can also see the horses opposite them. Each loose box has a tie ring, a large hay rack, automatic drinking bowl, a salt and mineral lick, a manger for feed and wood pellet bedding. The horses are identified by a nameplate hung above each box. Each horse has it’s own set of harness.
‘Before - lower stalls’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net ‘Conversion works’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net ‘New lower loose boxes’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net
The upper loose boxes were created in 2000, to replace the forty five original wooden stalls. The picture in the photo below was taken in June 1968, and shows the original arrangement.  There were three distinct sections, each with a central aisle and nine stalls on each side of two sections and one row of nine in the last section. The two end stalls in two of the sections were enclosed by doors - these were reserved for horses that might be nervous, or not tolerate others. The new boxes were designed by Hyder Consultants, with the work being carried out by McArds. The cost of the refurbishment was £220,000. The interior of the building has been completely stripped out and strengthened, and a new floor and roof added. The exterior of the building has remained the same. The whole area is very light and spacious, due to the high ceiling, giving a cleaner environment for the horses to live in. There is a total of fifteen loose boxes here, split into two sections both with a central aisle. There is also one loose box at the back of the building, next to the smithy. The horses can all see each other over the dividing walls and can also see the horses opposite them. Each loose box has a tie ring, hay rack, automatic drinking bowl, salt and mineral lick, a manger for feed and wood pellet bedding. The horses are identified by a nameplate hung on the wall or door outside each box. Harness is stored on pegs, and there is also room for large round bales of hay or haylage.  There is access to two storage lofts and an area where horses can be safely tied up to have their legs washed before work.  The horses are led out through the private car park to be changed over across the road.
‘After - upper loose boxes’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net ‘Before - upper stalls’ Photo  James Waite
The smithy is located at the very back of the building. Years ago the shoes were hand made from different lengths of mild steel to suit a variety of different sized horses. About one month before the horses were brought in from the fields, around two hundred pairs of shoes started to be made. (It is worth noting here that front and back pairs are different). When made, they were hung on pegs on the wall beside the forge. These pegs still exist and are used today. Until the end of 1973 the blacksmith was Andy Joughin. He used to run his own business in Douglas, retiring to leave his son Tom to carry it on. He must have been at least in his mid-seventies, originally taking the job for the season. As it turned out he ended up working there for four years. Again, it was his son that replaced him as the blacksmith, working alongside an apprentice who would qualify, and ensure that the profession would continue. Michael Crellin now takes over this role, but nowadays the horses are shod with ready-made shoes bought in. Shoes are generally re-fitted approximately every four weeks, but if a shoe becomes loose it will be carried out before then. Interesting fact: In 1938, rubber was added to the shoes, in an attempt to provide better grip on the road. This trial proved unsuccessful.
‘The smithy’ Photos  douglashorsetramway.net
The feed room is located on the ramp to the upper level and all feed is stored and prepared here. Feed buckets, scoops and various supplements are also kept here. Oats are fed into a hopper above the oat roller which then crushes them to make them easier to digest, enabling the energy to be quickly obtained. This area used to contain six stalls, (the partition of which still remains), the cobbled floor is also still present.
A new harness room was installed in May 2005.  It features a large central table with sink for cleaning harness, and all four walls are lined with hooks for hanging a complete set - (collar, hames and bridle). All harness is now being stored here when not in use over the winter (the old harness room was located in Tramway Terrace). Other bits of harness include the rarely used breast collars, a box full of name plates, various lengths of hame straps, breaking harness (lighter tubular hames, rope traces and sidelines), headcollars, lead ropes and rope halters. Years ago a saddler was employed to repair the harness, but nowadays it is sent away for any repairs which may be required at the end of each season.
‘New harness room’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net ‘Oat roller’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net
The ‘little stable’ is a small room off to the side of the yard, containing seven of the original stalls. Each stall has a tie ring, with a long line which enabled the horse to move around and lie down, a large hay rack, automatic drinking bowl, a salt and mineral lick and a manger for feed. The floor is lined with original cobbles. Each horse was identified by a name plate hanging above them, and each horse had its own collar, hames and bridle hanging on pegs to the left hand side.  This part of the stables received a new roof in April 2005, which now has three skylights to provide more natural light. These stalls are not used now, but have been retained to provide a history of the building. In 2016 it was opened up once more as a small gift shop and exhibition room, containing information and old photos. It can be viewed during the stable tours, which take place throughout the season.
‘The little stable’ Photo  douglashorsetramway.net ‘Tom Joughin’ Photo  Brian Mitchell Horsepower! Photo  www.douglashorsetramway.net
Tramway Stables Tucked away behind Tramway Terrace, the stables have been ‘home’ to the horses since 1877. Although modernised over the years, the old charm of a working stable is still evident.
‘Raad tram-cabbil baie ghoolish’ “….tinkling tramcars, like toast racks, Sweeping the curve of the bay.” (Sir Hall Caine) The Douglas Bay Horse Tramway