The horse trams are an iconic part of the of the Isle of Man. Started in 1876 by Thomas Lightfoot to take advantage of the booming tourist trade, the 3ft gauge horse tramway runs from the main depot at Derby Castle, along the Promenade to the Sea Terminal. The trams run from early April until early November, and are currently operated by Isle of Man Transport as part of their Heritage Railway offering. Many of the original fleet of cars are still in use today, and is a popular tourist attraction and tramway of important historic value. It is the oldest surviving Horse Tramway in Britain, and the only one to have operated continuously since its opening (with the exception of World War II). In South Australia, a similar system also exists. There are also other smaller horse drawn systems operating around the world.
Issue date: 23 May 2017 NEWS RELEASE DEPARTMENT OF INFRASTRUCTURE Isle of Man Transport Recommencement of service of Douglas Bay Horse Tramway The Douglas Bay Horse Tramway will resume a limited service from Wednesday 24th May 2017. The Douglas Bay Horse Tramway will commence operation on Wednesday 24 May with an hourly service from 9am to 4pm with horses Mark, Teddy, William, Douglas and Andrew. Thursday 25th and Friday 26th will see a half hourly service from 9am to 4pm with the addition of Rocky, Charles, Philip and Torrin. Ian Steve and Robert will return to service from Saturday 27th when the N timetable is in operation until Monday 29th May. Normal timetable services resume from Tuesday 30th May. Ian Longworth, Director of Public Transport, said: ‘We are very pleased that the horses are fit enough to return to work and we have done it on a phased basis to ensure their welfare’.
Image  John Hancox
The horse trams are an iconic part of the of the Isle of Man. Started in 1876 by Thomas Lightfoot to take advantage of the booming tourist trade, the 3ft gauge horse tramway runs from the main depot at Derby Castle, along the Promenade to the Sea Terminal. The trams run from early April until early November, and are currently operated by Isle of Man Transport as part of their Heritage Railway offering. Many of the original fleet of cars are still in use today, and is a popular tourist attraction and tramway of important historic value. It is the oldest surviving Horse Tramway in Britain, and the only one to have operated continuously since its opening (with the exception of World War II). In South Australia, a similar system also exists. There are also other smaller horse drawn systems operating around the world.
Issue date: 23 May 2017 NEWS RELEASE DEPARTMENT OF INFRASTRUCTURE Isle of Man Transport Recommencement of service of Douglas Bay Horse Tramway The Douglas Bay Horse Tramway will resume a limited service from Wednesday 24th May 2017. The Douglas Bay Horse Tramway will commence operation on Wednesday 24 May with an hourly service from 9am to 4pm with horses Mark, Teddy, William, Douglas and Andrew. Thursday 25th and Friday 26th will see a half hourly service from 9am to 4pm with the addition of Rocky, Charles, Philip and Torrin. Ian Steve and Robert will return to service from Saturday 27th when the N timetable is in operation until Monday 29th May. Normal timetable services resume from Tuesday 30th May. Ian Longworth, Director of Public Transport, said: ‘We are very pleased that the horses are fit enough to return to work and we have done it on a phased basis to ensure their welfare’.
Image  John Hancox
The horse trams are an iconic part of the of the Isle of Man. Started in 1876 by Thomas Lightfoot to take advantage of the booming tourist trade, the 3ft gauge horse tramway runs from the main depot at Derby Castle, along the Promenade to the Sea Terminal. The trams run from early April until early November, and are currently operated by Isle of Man Transport as part of their Heritage Railway offering. Many of the original fleet of cars are still in use today, and is a popular tourist attraction and tramway of important historic value. It is the oldest surviving Horse Tramway in Britain, and the only one to have operated continuously since its opening (with the exception of World War II). In South Australia, a similar system also exists. There are also other smaller horse drawn systems operating around the world.
Issue date: 23 May 2017 NEWS RELEASE DEPARTMENT OF INFRASTRUCTURE Isle of Man Transport Recommencement of service of Douglas Bay Horse Tramway The Douglas Bay Horse Tramway will resume a limited service from Wednesday 24th May 2017. The Douglas Bay Horse Tramway will commence operation on Wednesday 24 May with an hourly service from 9am to 4pm with horses Mark, Teddy, William, Douglas and Andrew. Thursday 25th and Friday 26th will see a half hourly service from 9am to 4pm with the addition of Rocky, Charles, Philip and Torrin. Ian Steve and Robert will return to service from Saturday 27th when the N timetable is in operation until Monday 29th May. Normal timetable services resume from Tuesday 30th May. Ian Longworth, Director of Public Transport, said: ‘We are very pleased that the horses are fit enough to return to work and we have done it on a phased basis to ensure their welfare’.
Image  John Hancox
Raad tram-cabbil baie ghoolish
The Douglas Bay Horse Tramway
“….tinkling tramcars, like toast racks, Sweeping the curve of the bay.” (Sir Hall Caine)
“….tinkling tramcars, like toast racks, Sweeping the curve of the bay.” (Sir Hall Caine)
The Douglas Bay Horse Tramway
Raad tram-cabbil baie ghoolish
Raad tram-cabbil baie ghoolish
The Douglas Bay Horse Tramway
“….tinkling tramcars, like toast racks, Sweeping the curve of the bay.” (Sir Hall Caine)